2018 Sauk Valley Community College Healthcare Professions Pinning Ceremony

2018 Sauk Valley Community College Healthcare Professions Pinning Ceremony


Janet Lynch: Good afternoon, everyone. I’m Janet Lynch, I’m the Dean of Health Professions
here at Sauk Valley Community College. I’ve had that honor for fifteen years. I’ve been a faculty member for 32 years at
the college. So, this 50th anniversary means a lot to me. It also means a lot to our board of trustees,
our administration, the rest of our faculty and staff. We welcome you as well as the deserving candidates
here, as proud families and friends, and we also welcome members of the first nursing
graduating class to our 50th annual pinning ceremony. To begin our celebration, I would like to
introduce Dr. Jon Mandrell our Vice President, who will extend his welcoming remarks. Dr. Jon Mandrell: Good afternoon. Our President, Dr. David Hellmich, is unable
to join us; he is out of state with a family matter, so he sends all of his congratulations
to our graduates. While we recognize all candidates for pinning
today, I would like to especially acknowledge our appreciation for the first students and
graduates who helped the college start its journey 50 years ago. We have with us tonight the following nurses
from our very first pinning ceremony in 1968. They are: Kathleen Loan
Beverly (Mach) Shoemaker Mary (Coffey) Murphy
Linda (Sterricker) Dennis Jackie (Warner) Wasson (Applause) We are thrilled these nurses and their husbands
could join us as well as Dr. Joan LeSage one of our first nursing faculty members at the
college. We also have with us SVCC’s first student
government President Kent Dennis, the husband of Linda Sterricker (Applause)
as well as Dennis P. Fulrath. Dennis was SVCC’s third student government
President and is a current member of our Board of Trustees. Dennis was the impetus behind creating this
special recognition of our 50th pinning ceremony. He holds SVCC dear. I also would like to acknowledge our other
Board of Trustee members present tonight. Would they please stand. Last but not least, please help us welcome
back Dr. Catherine Akker. (Applause)
Dr. Akker has suffered serious health issues this semester. She has overcome many obstacles through her
hard work and perseverance and we are grateful she can be with us tonight as she played a
large role in this ADN class’ educational preparation. Janet Lynch: At this time in our program,
we invite the various student representatives for the programs to reflect on their feelings
and memories over the past one or two years. Representing the Associate Degree Nursing
Program, Manuel Mooney. Manuel Mooney: Wow, I didn’t want to get emotional. So good to see Cathy. You guys look great today, by the way. Great house, great house. Thank you so much for electing me to be your
speaker tonight. It has meant so much to me and I love each
and every one of you dearly. (Applause) Thank you. I would also like to say thank you to the
original class of ADN’s in 1968. Thank you so much for being here. (Applause) Also, I would like to take this
opportunity to say thank you to the administration for the support you give the health occupations
every day for the support of the board of trustees, they do amazing things in supporting
our nursing program. They spend a lot of money. Thank you so much. To the faculty, thank you so much for your
dedication to train new nurses. Fellow graduates, thank you for all the hard
work you have put in to be here tonight to finish your program. You have made this dream a reality. Thank you. And finally, to our family and our friends,
thank you for your patience, your love, and your support. You have given us over the last two years. It is that support and love that allows us
to sit here tonight. Thank you so much. (Applause) Graduates, we have made it through
some long days and nights of studying. Don’t make fun of me now. We have made it through ridiculous test questions
where every answer was right but one answer was more right. And that cannot be correct grammar. We made it through dump trucks of information
being dumped on us, 7 and 15 chapters at a time; we’ve made it through the implementation
of the new ADN curriculum. During this process we have learned many things. We’ve learned how to sift through that ton
of information and get to the meat of what is there. That’s a hard thing to do but we’ve done it. We’ve learned how to expect and work through
change. Change happens all the time. We’ve learned how to work together as a team,
and that’s true, we are a team. And we have learned that our choice to become
nurses was the right choice for us. Thank you. To each of our instructors, I would like to
express our appreciation for your willingness to pass on your knowledge and experience to
new nurses. I think back to our first year, second semester
and I remember Amy West. I wish Amy could be here but she couldn’t
tonight. Amy, we all heard, “She’s tough,” and
boy they were right. She was tough, but she told us what she expected
from us and those expectations never changed. So for that, I will always remember Amy. She treated every student the same and went
out of her way to make sure she was being fair. Many of our instructors showed great patience
while instructing us. “I just don’t get it what do you mean? What do you mean critical thinking?” It is yes or no – why does it have to be something
else?” Whether in lecture or lab, clinical, our instructors
could be counted on to help us, to correct us, and to advocate for us. Thank you again to all the instructors and
staff that truly worked tirelessly to get us to complete our program today. Thank you. When the second year of our ADN program started
there was about 20 LPNs that joined our class. I can tell you, I was a little bit hesitant. How are we going to put 44 people in a classroom
and get anything out of it. But Cathy made a way. I learned a whole lot this semester, but what
I learned were you guys are fantastic nurses and fantastic people. You blessed our year by joining us and thank
you so much. Looking back over the past two years, I can
remember getting to know each and all of you. Each graduate has a story and you guys know
me, I love to hear people’s stories. That’s why I’m a nurse, cuz I want to hear
people’s stories. Each graduate has been working hard to meet
a goal and trying to better their life. Some of you young whippersnappers – that’s
the southern – are just starting your adult life. You’re going to go into a new career, you’re
going to get your first house, you’re going to be on your own for the first time. Some of you are starting a family. Janet, they didn’t listen. I think there were like three babies birthed
during our program and at least that I know of two more on the way, so some of you’re
starting that family. Some of you are trying to better provide for
your existing family and then some of you like myself are changing course in the middle
of your life to become a nurse. We each have dreams that are, that we are
trying to fulfill but as Nurses you will fulfill them in service to others. And for that reason I am proud to know each
and every one of you. However, because we have finished nursing
school there are a few things we are going to have to give up. We’re going to have to give up those discussion
board posts. Woo hoo! I will not miss them. We’re going to have to give up the emotions
after an ATI test. Oh yeah. No more end of the semester clinical evaluation
forms. Oh, but make sure you turn yours in for this
semester. No more being told what you can and cannot
eat in the classroom or drink, and no more listening to me about scholarships and campus
activities. And finally, for some of you, you know who
you are – no more day drinking. You got to give it up. In conclusion, it has been my honor to be
accepted into Sauk’s ADN program and to be a part of this amazing group of students
and nurses. Again, I say thank you for the opportunity
to speak today and I urge you to go on conquer the NCLEX test, and become a nurse that makes
a difference in each one of our client’s futures, and a difference in our profession. Thank you. (Applause) Janet Lynch: Thank you Manuel. For the Practical Nursing program, would Patricia
Garcia please come. Patricia Garcia: My name is Patricia Garcia,
I can’t even say my name. My speech is about vision. I am 61 years old, so I keep vision alive. (Applause) First, I would like to thank Sauk
Valley College and the LPN Nursing Program for the class of 2018 in pursuit of their
LPN vision. I would also like to recognize Janet Lynch,
Dean of Nursing, I’d like to recognize Christy Vincent, Angie Delmont for Med Surg, the instructors
and Kayla Gaffey, OB instructor for equipping us with understanding, knowledge and wisdom
of the body, how it functions, and our role in the healing process. The season for the class of 2018 was described
by a fellow classmate, Shauna Partridge, as this: I have literally never struggled to
go to sleep in the same moment I couldn’t keep my eyes open, cried in the same moment
I laughed, and smiled in the same second I wanted to scream. And as the end gets closer, I find it more
scary and overwhelming. Bittersweet. As this season ends, another season begins. Time cannot be stored, stopped, or slowed. There is a time limit to everything in life
and each experience is a gift that we have been entrusted with and must not waste. Like money, it should be managed wisely and
not spent. Now that this season in our lives is coming
to an end, I speak to activating your vision with the tools we have been given for our
tomorrow. Vision is about where you’re going not where
you’re at. As you continue on in your nursing careers,
have big vision. Use your God given power to determine your
destiny. The decision you make today and act on, creates
opportunity and your tomorrow. Tear down every negative thought that tries
to prevail against you as you pursue your vision and future that lies within you. Align yourself with positive people, people
of encouragement and those who know that you are exceptional. Bishop T.D. Jakes summed vision up in this
way, and these are his comments and I don’t want any emails about I don’t have a Master’s
and I’m still smart. Bishop Jakes stated that he was writing a
column for Wall Street Journal. He stated that the editor had him all pumped
up and he thought that the column was going well. Until he started reading the reviews. Bishop Jakes said to himself, “They don’t
like me. Why am I wasting my time on this column no
one likes.” So he stopped writing the column. Well, the editor called and asked why he stopped
writing the column, and he said “Because I started reading the reviews and I didn’t think
I was good at it.” So the editor says to Bishop Jakes, “Those
are not our constituents. The people that we write to are intellectual,
articulate, readers with Master’s or mores. The people that are commenting can’t even
spell. You cannot use the comments as an indication
of the audience because our readers don’t have time to comment.” Bishop Jakes said he suddenly realized that
he had lost an opportunity to talk to the giraffe. But he was distracted by the turtles. In every person’s life, there is a giraffe
and a turtle. They occupy the same space. The turtle is geographically in the same location
as the giraffe is, but the turtle is eating on the level of his vision, and the giraffe
is eating on the level of his vision. Whenever turtles comment on the giraffes,
you can’t trust their comments because their comments are a reflection of their world view. It’s okay to ignore turtles in your life. Know that you are perfect for your God given
vision, which is to serve others, to be a part of something bigger than yourself. I find this to be one of the greatest gifts
one can have. The gift of healing. Our attitude every day is a reflection of
our mission and our vision. So, I appreciate who you are, this is the
season to discover yourself. And I’ll ask all the LPNs to stand. Place your right hand over your left shoulder
and pat yourself and give yourself an atta boy. (Applause) Thank you. Janet Lynch: Thank you Patricia. Representing Radiologic Technology, Emily
Bay. (Applause) Emily Bay: Well if there was anything Maggie
and Dianne ever taught me, it was to come prepared. So… “Opportunity is missed most by people because
it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” Thomas Edison. No one sitting here in front of me today is
here because they wanted life to be easy or because they wanted things handed to them. We’re all here because we just completed the
most mentally and emotionally difficult two years of our lives and we did it because we
want to make a difference. We know what it’s like to work hard, study
hard, and achieve our goals. A brief overview of the Radiology program
because a lot of times I feel like when you tell people, “Oh, I’m in the Radiology
program,” they go radio what? Ha, X-ray. X-ray. So, the very first day of class we learned
how to position for x-rays. We learned hand, foot, wrist, abdomen, you
name it – we learned it all. We learned so many that in fact, in 6 weeks
we learned, tested on, and passed 85 different positions. And that was just first semester. Second semester we did it all over again for
another 75 positions, for a grand total of 160 positions in 6 months. Not only did we learn about positioning, we
learned how to operate the Machinery, what size image receptors to use, how many inches
the X-ray tube needed to be away from the Bucky, and then we had to learn not to say
Bucky because no one knows what Bucky is. While doing all this we still had to go to
class, learn everything about every bone in the human body, and we didn’t get a summer
break, we took Physics, our favorite. We learned how x-rays are produced, how they
move through the tube, how the image receptor interprets the x-rays, and how the images
appear on the screen before us. And then we had to learn how our eyes work
so that we can read the image in front of us. Then we went to clinicals all summer long
too and now as second-year students were in clinicals 3 full days a week, class 2 days
a week and we typically spend about 32 hours between the two. And that doesn’t include commutes and it doesn’t
include studying time. It can be very overwhelming. We started the program with 26 students and
we ended up with (unintelligible). We have two students that are Lambda Nu and
that’s the Honor Society and if you don’t know what that is, that means you have to
have a 3.5 GPA or higher. So for two of us to have that, you worked
hard, because wow! None of us knew what we were going to be getting
ourselves into, but looking back, it’s been worth it. (Applause) Our whole class is like a family. We’ve been there for each other through Sims
and awful tests that, you know, a lot of our tests, they’re all right but one is the most
right. We’ve gone on a lot of trips together. We went into Chicago for the RSNA and we learned
about the newest and greatest technology and MRI CT x-ray. But I mean, honestly, we were there for the
free pens and all the other free things. We went to Peoria for the Illinois State Society
of Radiologic Technologists and we heard experiences from techs and physicists from all over the
state. We even got to hear our physics textbook author
speak. And we stayed the night a couple of nights
and made some incredible memories from AJ winning dance-offs and Liana winning limbo
competitions and we- the most important lesson we learned from Peoria was that just because
we’re in a Karaoke bar doesn’t mean you can sing. We owe a tremendous amount of thanks to our
incredible instructors for all the time and effort put into us and our education. Maggie, Dianna, Jesse and Vicky and all of
our clinical instructors at each hospital site have gone above and beyond for us these
last two years. They’ve created study guides, answered endless
amounts of questions before tests, mostly from Al. They’ve had our backs at clinicals and they’ve
had our rough days and pushed us to always be the best we can be. They are truly here because they love what
they do and they have our best interests in mind. I’m sniffing a lot, I’m sorry. We would not be here if it weren’t for their
patience, kindness, and dedication to the program. We also owe our families as much gratitude
as we do our instructors for putting up with our crazy schedules, fluctuating emotions
as we balanced studying clinicals, work, and each one of our family member’s schedules
too. It’s been a crazy 2 years for some with families
changing and growing, little ones growing up in the blink of an eye, new engagements,
and new-found loves. The education we have received, the memories
that were created and everything we learned along the way about ourselves and each other
cannot be taken away from us and it will be cherished for years to come. So congratulations to us. (Applause)
And I’m going to leave you with my favorite quote from Christina Yang. Have some fire, be unstoppable,
be a force of nature. Be better than anyone else here and don’t
give a damn about what anyone else thinks (Applause) Janet Lynch: Thank you Emily. All of you speakers, thank you for the excellent
job you’ve done to represent your classes. As I indicated before, this is the 50th year
of pinning at Sauk Valley Community College. Before we pin the candidates tonight, it is
appropriate for us to briefly travel through the past 50 years of health professions at
SVCC as well as some glimpses into the national landscape. The tradition of formal training for health
care professions is really only about 150 years old. Prior to the 1870’s most people were cared
for in their homes by family members. As we all know, the college was founded in
1965. The first graduating class was 1968. Upon review of Sauk’s nursing and rad history,
I found many wonderful things. I found a quote in the 1967 yearbook “We
needed Sauk”. We still do. I found many names- administration, faculty
and students that I remember with fondness. There are too many wonderful people to mention
but we hope they know they are never forgotten. I found historically in the 1960’s that
the first neonatal ICU was established at that time and it was also the beginning of
the Nurse Practitioner role. Nurse practitioners are now well-established
as primary care providers today. And actually one of our first faculty members,
Joan Lesage, has been instrumental in Nurse Practitioner education. Radiology was a department with film and view
boxes, equipment with very basic functions. Advances in digital imaging have drastically
changed this profession. I also found that many things did not change:
From work force council minutes: 1970 – budget cut from $1100 to $880. $20 a day paid to subs. 1976 minutes say “difficulty finding areas
for clinical experiences. And they were suggesting that students be
assigned to ride in emergency vehicles. In 1977, I found reference that equipment
was needed for the labs, and this included beds, overbed tables, a gurney. And in 1979 I found that the BSN was being
blamed for drawing applicants from the SVCC nursing program. I also in 1984 found concern over size of
student groups and reflecting on how Nurse Practice Act will change ADN and LPN education. ADN comprise 53% of all basic RN programs
in 1986 and 55% of all new RN’s. The important thing about community colleges
is that these people live, work and vote where they’re educated. In 1989, the nursing shortage was in the minutes
and they talked about infection control, geriatric training that those things needed to be enhanced. All of these ring true today. So, before we move forward, we’re going to
show you a brief video of our 50 year journey at Sauk. And please direct your attention to our NE
wall. (music plays, no narration) Thank you, I hope you enjoyed that as much
as we enjoyed putting it together. It’s time for the presentation of the candidates
and the awarding of the pins. We are going to have some congestion up here,
but families are welcome to come along the side of the cord, along the red line there. Your student will be pinned on this side. The family members that are going to pin their
student, you’ll be coming up this way and the student ambassadors are going to help
you know when your row is up and those kinds of things. We’ll do a row at a time. Will the 1968 year class, receiving an honorary
pin, please present themselves for pinning. The graduates are being pinned by our board
member, Dennis P. Fulrath. Kathleen Loan Clark Linda Sterricker Dennis Mary Coffey Murphy Beverly Shoemaker Mock Jackie Warner Wasson
We hope you all know how thrilled we are that you are with us tonight. Will the Associate Degree Candidates please
present themselves for pinning. They will be pinned by faculty or assisted
by faculty member Kayla Gaffey. Heather Becker is being pinned by Lauri Becker. Sherri Bellini is being pinned by Jeff Ellis. Jalon Bruder is being pinned by Kayla Gaffey. Sarah Bryan is being pinned by Carol Chandler
RN and Deb Bryan. Audrey Cain is being pinned by Jackson and
Jeanie Cain Jeffrey Carr is being pinned by Christina
and Liam Carr Angela Dennis is being pinned by Kayla Gaffey
Vincent DeVito is being pinned by his father, Joe DeVito
Magdaline Egert is being pinned by her children and husband with the assistance of Kayla Gaffey. Katherine Gillespie is being pinned by her
parents Lois and Kent Gillespie. Jacob Gorski is being pinned by Tish Emmole,
RN Jessie Grett is being pinned by Patti Jordan,
RN BSN Danielle Grobe is being pinned by Danette
Minks RN BSN Mia Gustafson is being pinned by her daughters
Karah and Addyson Gustafson Susan Hendricks is being pinned by Paul Czech Donna Hines is being pinned by Travis and
Aspen Hines Brittany Holocker is being pinned by Sheila
Risley Joseph Kelly is being pinned by Abbey Kelly
Vanessa Kitsmiller is being pinned by Kayla Gaffey Miranda Lee is being pinned by Meadow Lee
and Alysha Guy Melissa Lombardo is being pinned by Rosario,
Gail, and Rosaria Lombardo Penny Loos is being pinned by Kayla Gaffey
Hannah Matheney is being pinned by her mother, Janet Matheney
Angelica McCoy is being pinned by husband, John McCoy. Melissa Meusel is being pinned by Kayla Gaffey
Kaitlyn Miller is being pinned by Jamie Dauphin RN
Nathan Miller is being pinned by Dina Hay. Theresa Molina is being pinned by her sons
Adrian and Adan. Manuel Mooney is being pinned by his spouse
Shanna Mooney Heather Moser is being pinned by Mason and
John Moser Jesse Pate is being pinned by Kayla Gaffey
Jillian Peabody is being pinned by her mother in law Penny Linville RN
Raquel Romano is being pinned by her father, Anthony Romano Amanda Roy is being pinned by her husband
Mark Roy Laura Sabath is being pinned by Kayla Gaffey
Andrew Sawtelle is being pinned by Erika Sinnott Nora Serrano is being pinned by her daughters
Jenaeya, Milli, Ariana, and Naveah Angela Thomas is being pinned by her husband
Jackson Thomas Lynn Treynor is being pinned by Kayla Gaffey Riley Walters is being pinned by Vicki VanNatta
Alisha Wetzell is being pinned by her children Evan, Bryce, and Madilynn Wetzell Mary Williamson is being pinned by her father
David Carlson Janet Lynch: Well, this is pretty awesome,
I have to say, the first year we’ve had the family members and loved ones do this and
I’m all for it. This is great. Would the Radiologic Technology Candidates
please present themselves for pinning. Emily Bay is being pinned by Tracy Bay and
Linda Smith Liana Campollo is being pinned by her finace
Michael Fogle Kenneth Catton is being pinned by Lori Catton Victoria Garcia is being pinned by Traci Temiquel
Danielle Hartman is being pinned by her mother, Lora Hartman
Mikayla Fraze is being pinned by Jake Fraze Kayla Hoyt is being pinned by Debbie Kiper
and Hallie and Gunnar Hoyt Catherine Hughes is being pinned by Scott
and Edward Hughes Almedin Izejrovski is being pinned by Senad
Ajvazi Ajin Joy is being pinned by Ashish Joy
Nancy Juarez is being pinned by Maria Juarez and Felipe and Jonah Sierra Bronte Nusbaum is being pinned by Cindy and
Eddie Nusbaum Jenna Peterson is being pinned by Kim Jensen
Breanna Sandrock is being pinned by Ben and Traci Sandrock Trista Shelley is being pinned by Ben Johnson
and Robin Thompson Kimberly Smith is being pinned by Jordan and
Kennedie Smith Katherine Stanton is being pinned by Lourin
Stanton, Jayde, Hayden, Lewis, and Lauren Stanton Assisting in the pinning was Maggie Young,
Radiologic Technology faculty. Congratulations Radiologic Technology candidates. Will the Licensed Practical Nurses please
present themselves for pinning. Faculty assisting is Christine Vincent. Christy Beightol being pinned by Kyleigh Galvan
and her boyfriend Jesse Galvin Chelsea Brown being pinned by her fiancé
William and her son Kian Ashley Butler being pinned by her grandmother
Gwen Mead Brittney Dalton being pinned by her mother
Rachel Dalton Alicia Eastman being pinned by Christie Vincent
Susan Fish being pinned by her husband Jon and son Christopher Patricia Garcia being pinned by her son Micah
Sullivan Shannon Gipe being pinned by her son Cooper
and significant other Tom Amanda Kusk being pinned by Christie Vincent Anna Harshman being pinned by her father,
Michael Harshman Kayla Hunt being pinned by her mother Colleen
Hunt and her daughter Amelia Rosquist Brittany Johnson being pinned by Tyler and
Jaedyn Blevins Lora Ludwig being pinned by her daughters
Abby Johnson and Kelsie Ludwig Gina Medina being pinned by Christie Vincent Shauna Partridge being pinned by her daughter
Michelle Henderson-Bellows Trisha Richards being pinned by her son Gabriel
Garza Jennifer Seeley being pinned by her daughter
Genevieve Seeley and her husband Dustin Amanda Thomas being pinned by her mother Peggy
Ovall Michelle Valdez being pinned by her husband
Angelo Valdez Congratulations to all of our LPN candidates. And Richard, if you could now bless us with
a song for reflection, we’d appreciate that. Solo – Richard Criss – “A Moment Like
This” Janet Lynch: You always make us smile, Richard, thank you. This part of the program is where the students
choose one person from their class that exemplifies the following criteria:
Leadership, service, perseverance, patient advocate, professionalism, and enthusiasm. The person receiving the ADN award, fellow
students had this to say: From the start has shown professionalism, respect and generosity. Organized and maintains professional appearance. I have profound respect for this individual. Exemplifies the definition of outstanding
nurse. Goes above and beyond effortlessly. Kind hearted. Always strives for excellence. A Leader who does what is right. Would Manuel Mooney please come forward. Manuel Mooney: I don’t have any words. The only thing that makes me special is the
people who love me and the ones that I love. Thank you so much, God bless. Dianna Brevitt: Before I announce ours, first
I would like to acknowledge the Lamda Nu honor Society members in our class. So to be Lambda Nu you have to have a 3.5
GPA or higher would be Bronte Nusbaum and Trista Shelley. Way to go! The Radiology class had these comments about
the classmate they chose for the award: always friendly and has a positive attitude, encouraging
and helpful, taken many leadership roles in the past 2 years, always strives to do her
best. The recognition award goes to Trista Shelly. Trista Shelley: I do want to say thank you
to my family and my classmates. You guys have been wonderful; without you
guys, I wouldn’t be here. I am here because of you guys and my family
and friends, thank you. Janet Lynch: The LPN students had this to
say about their Award winner: gives insight to others on what may help them, always calm,
provides patience and kindness, professional everyday. Whether it’s cool or clinical, positive attitude
and smile, displays genuine compassion, always eager to learn and ready to take on whatever
is thrown her way. Will Jennifer Sealy please come forward? Jennifer Seeley: Thank you to my classmates;
if it weren’t for you guys, I don’t know, I don’t know. To my husband and my kids thank you for putting
up with me and all your patience and my family, everything you guys have done to make this
happen is so appreciated, so woo! Jon Mandrell: What a beautiful evening! I can’t begin to put it into words, to tell
you about the wonderful view I h ave up here, there’s just nothing better than this. Graduates, today marks a great milestone in
your academic journey and career. Take in every moment. Look around you and savor the moment as you
have envisioned this day since you committed to this long hard road. It hasn’t been easy, but that is part of
the great academic journey. We are so very proud of you tonight as we
know of the many more lives that you will impact in our community and beyond. Don’t forget, in your next exciting chapter,
remember to pay it forward to a student that is embarking on the journey you are celebrating
tonight. Be not only great practitioners in the field,
but also mentors. And don’t forget about us here at SVCC. We care about each and every one of you and
your successes and expect to hear from you and see you. Tonight….is only the beginning of another
chapter with us. The Sauk family is always here and quite often,
many of you may even return to us to teach and transform yet many more lives in your
field. At this time, I’d like to thank the many
health professions faculty, staff, and administration that have challenged you along this great
journey, which includes Dr. Cathy Akker, Mary Margaret Evans, Kayla Gaffey, Mary Heitman,
Christy Vincent, Angie Delmont, Therese Wood, Kim Cole, and Janet Lynch. A special thank you to Mary Heitman, Mary,
where are you? Please stand. (Applause) Mary will be retiring. Mary, thank you for all you have done for
our college, its students, and the community. You will be greatly missed. Furthermore, I would like to thank the Rad
Tech faculty – Dianna Brevitt and Maggie Young, for their great work. (Applause)
I also must thank the many great healthcare
providers in our community that open their doors to our students so that they can gain
experience in the clinical settings and join us in the growth of the workforce and train
the students to provide the very best to patients and the community. Through this, in 50 years, drum roll please,
we have seen 1,329 AND, 1,250 LPN, and 698 Rad Tech graduates complete their degrees
at SVCC. Congratulations on joining this elite group. Go forth and be proud of all you have accomplished. Thank you. Janet Lynch: Thank you Dr. Mandrell. These pins mark you for life as a symbol of
the profession you have joined. It is a strong distinguished group. We are proud of you! We have confidence in you! Lead through continued growth. Know that you are privileged to help others
and accept your obligation to do the right thing. Patients don’t need you to be perfect, but
they do need to know they can rely on you. Change will continue as Emanuel said, at an
exponential rate. However, the fundamental aspects of caring
and life-long learning still apply to all practice. These programs and their impact on the community
will continue to evolve and grow as we all work towards the best outcomes for all patients. You will be our leaders. You have accepted the duty of taking care
of patients and each other. So, ask yourselves how you will be able to
make a difference. Bloom where you are planted. What is the bigger picture or purpose you
wish to realize in your career? When you look back on your career, we hope
you can say “well done”. We place ourselves in your hands. This concludes our ceremony for this evening. Thank you for coming. The stage party and candidates will exit first. Please join us in the West Mall for refreshments
and the Dillon Mall for professional photographs. Thank you.

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