Nursing Candle Lighting Ceremony (January 2019)

Nursing Candle Lighting Ceremony (January 2019)


– Okay, ladies and gentlemen. My name is Cheryl Spencer. Welcome to the Candlelighting Ceremony for the graduating class of fall 2018. The graduates are about
to enter the theater. (“Pomp and Circumstance”) Ladies and gentlemen,
the class of fall 2018. (audience applauds) At this time, I ask the audience to please stand for our national anthem, and to remain standing for the invocation. The national anthem
will be led by a former graduate of this program, Maria
Virginia Villadiego Punto. Virginia? (“The Star Spangled Banner”) ♪ Oh, say can you see ♪ ♪ By the dawn’s early light ♪ ♪ What so proudly we hailed ♪ ♪ At the twilight’s last gleaming ♪ ♪ Whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ Through the perilous fight ♪ ♪ O’er the ramparts we watched ♪ ♪ Were so gallantly streaming ♪ ♪ And the rocket’s red glare ♪ ♪ The bombs bursting in air ♪ ♪ Gave proof through the night ♪ ♪ That our flag was still there ♪ ♪ Oh say does that
star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ O’er the land of the free ♪ ♪ And the home of the brave ♪ (audience applauds) – Thank you, Virginia. At this time I’d like to ask
Dr. Barbara Blake-Campbell of the nursing department
to give the invocation. Dr. Campbell? – Lord, grant us the grace
to be givers of your love. Given from a place that
expects no returns. Given from a heart that
knows no boundaries. Given from a heart that
transcends all pain. Given from a heart that seeks no gain. It is only when we give of ourselves we give the gifts of the heart. Love, kindness, joy,
understanding, sympathy, tolerance and forgiveness and grace. We give of ourself when
we give gifts of the mind. Ideas, dreams, purposes, ideals, principles, plans, projects, poetry. When we give of ourself, we
give gifts of the spirit. Prayer, vision, beauty,
aspiration, peace and faith. We give of ourselves when we give words. The gift of words of encouragement, inspiration, guidance, and hope. It is when we give from the heart, the spirit and the mind
that we honor the divine. (audience applauds) – Thank you Dr. Campbell. Audience, please be seated. Graduates, please be seated. Ladies and gentlemen, at this time, I would just like to take
a moment and ask anyone in the audience who is
a nurse, please stand so these graduates can recognize you. Faculty. (laughs) Other nurses, I see some back there. (audience applauds) Thank you. Goals. And if there are anybody who have served in our amazing military, veterans, current, past, could you please stand up so we can acknowledge
you and thank you. Yes.
(audience applauds) Thank you so much. At this time, I’d like to introduce Dr. Timothy Lynch to give
the President’s Address. Dr. Lynch? – Thank you, good afternoon everyone. And welcome to the Fall
Candlelighting Ceremony, where we acknowledge the incredible accomplishments of you,
our nursing graduates. I’m extremely proud, as are your family, friends, and especially
your standing faculty, to share this momentous day in your life. The wonderful diversity that
I see in this graduating class defines the diversity
of the college itself. And diversity in the nursing field in particular is essential. Because communication
with patients is enhanced when healthcare providers
such as yourselves bridge the divide between
the culture of medicine and the beliefs and
principles that make up your patients’ value system. As graduates, you can look
back on a rewarding journey through the nursing program,
the most competitive program that Queensborough has to offer. Each year, hundreds of
students aspire to be in our nursing program,
yet fewer than half make it to the clinical sequence. 53 of you, out of those
hundreds of students, have successfully completed
the degree program. As you know, this year, Governor Cuomo signed into law the BSN in 10, a bachelor of science
in nursing in 10 years. Queensborough is ahead of many colleges in its commitment to encourage graduates to obtain a bachelors of science degree through our dual joint
programs with Hunter College, York College, and the CUNY
School of Professional Studies. I encourage all of you to
earn a bachelors degree, to better prepare
yourself for the expanding and evolving healthcare environment, which is increasing in complexity. I take deep pride in the
dedication each of you has demonstrated, not
only in your studies, but also in your pledge
as future caregivers. The education provided by your faculty and the nursing curriculum
at Queensborough College has given you a solid
foundation of core values. Values that will distinguish
you as effective, empathetic healthcare practitioners. Again, congratulations and best wishes in your future academic
and professional pursuits. (audience applauds) – Thank you, Dr. Lynch. At this time, please welcome Professor Anne Marie Menendez, chairperson
of the nursing department to give the Chairperson’s Address. Professor Menendez?
(audience applauds) – Good afternoon,
congratulation graduates. For many of you, this day
has been a long time coming. But here you are, nurses, and ready to move on to the next step. Yesterday I mentioned that this past week, I attended the wedding
of my niece in Florida. She graduated from
nursing school last year. I was introduced to two of her
friends from nursing school, who she now works with in cardiac care. They spoke openly of the
challenges completing a nursing program and their subsequent
first year in practice. These experiences, they went on to say, resulted in a very strong bond. They described themselves as life friends. Ironically, I also met
another nurse at the wedding, who had just retired after
40 years of practice. She had worked in different
parts of the country, and in various capacities
as a surgical nurse. Her last position was as a consultant to a large medical
facility, tasked to develop and implement an outpatient
surgical program. When I asked her how her
retirement was going, she stated that she has
continued to be very busy. When speaking with elderly
members of her community, she became dismayed
learning that they did not have an understanding of
their medical conditions, they did not know what
their medications were, and they did not have the
knowledge or the confidence to ask the right questions of
their healthcare providers. This nurse has become
a healthcare advocate, accompanying community
members on healthcare visits. As you begin your career in nursing, you may find the beginning
days challenging, and at times overwhelming. But each new day will bring
opportunity to enhance your skills and foster confidence. Your patience will help you
grow as a nurse and a person, and you will become more insightful. Your nursing colleagues will support you, and some will become your closest friends, maybe even life friends. As I told my niece and her friends, they have a long, brilliant
career ahead of them. I wish you the same success, and a long, fulfilling career in
the nursing profession. Congratulations and best wishes. (audience applauds) – Thank you Professor Menendez. The graduating class has
selected Professor Philip Nelan to deliver the congratulatory address. Professor Nelan. (audience applauds) – President Lynch, Dr.
Palmer, Professor Melendez, faculty and staff, parents,
friends and family, and above all and most importantly, the graduating class of the
nursing department fall 2018. I congratulate each of you on
your great accomplishments, an undertaking that is
by far no easy task. And one in which you
should be extremely proud. Today marks a significant
moment in your lives. And one that you will never forget. And one that you will recall many times. You are one step closer to
making your dream a reality. And one day closer to joining one of the greatest professions. I know I speak in the
name of every person here when I say congratulations
to each and every one of you. The poet T.S. Eliot once wrote
in my end is my beginning. Today we celebrate with
mixed emotions the ending of your time here at
Queensborough Community College. You have successfully
completed all the requirements set forth by the college,
the nursing department, and the state, which now affords you the opportunity to take
your licensing exam. I am sure that you will celebrate the end of sleepless nights,
missed family obligations, early morning classes, and even
earlier clinical rotations. The endless hours of
studying, test anxiety, and waiting for your exam results. No one here would argue against the fact that a nursing degree is a difficult one, with many challenges, long hours and days. The nursing degree here at Queensborough Community College is a challenging one. But the high percentage of
pass rates on the state boards demonstrates a strong program. And soon you will be counted amongst the graduates of this program. You should be very proud of yourselves and what you have accomplished, and in what you are prepared to do, and what you will accomplish. You did it, and you did it well. So I ask you, how did you do it? How did you get to this day? You did it with extremely
hard work and much dedication. You did it with the support
of your family and friends who are present here, and those
that are not present here. You did it because of your
accomplishment to be a nurse. You did it because you care for people. And in some small way, want to make the world a better place. You did it because you
realized, whether or not, you did it because of
the support and the care of the nursing faculty and
staff, who believed in you, and believe it or not, were
your greatest supporters. You had educators who cared about you. Yes, even at times challenge you. But did so with the simple reason of wanting you to be successful. And to be the best nurse
you could possibly be. Most importantly, I
believe that you did it because somewhere deep in your heart, whether it be in the right
atrium or the right ventricle, you know it was a path you wanted to take. And here you are at the end,
your candlelighting ceremony. As T.S. Eliot once wrote,
and my end is my beginning, and today marks the beginnings
of many things for you. Soon, you will have the great opportunity to be a part of the nursing profession. You will enter into
people’s lives at the most vulnerable times, and
they will need you to be their advocates, their
supporters, and their educators. They may not address
you by your first name. But they certainly will
address you by nurse, which is a term that means to nourish. You will nourish people’s minds, their souls and their bodies, and at times you may be their only visitor. The only one to ask how they’re feeling. The only one to say goodbye
at the end of the day. It is a special, special gift to enter into someone’s life at
the most difficult times, but even more of a gift
that allows you to enter into their lives and see
them for who they are. Over time, your definition of what it means to be a nurse will change. But that’s okay, because
you as an individual will grow and change, just as you change and grow during your time here. There will be challenges, obstacles and barriers that you will endure, but you will deal with them successfully because of the foundation you received here at Queensborough. Face the challenges, move the obstacles, overcome the barriers as I know you can and I know you will. However, I must tell you there
is much more to be learned from even better teachers
than you had here. Who are these teachers? Who are these teachers
that you have yet to meet? They are your patients. Who will inevitably teach you of what and how it means to be a nurse. Listen to them, learn
from them, care for them, nourish them, and even more, love them. For they will love you. That I can promise. There’s a story told and
everyone loves stories. I have shared this with students
in my clinical rotation, but it bears repeating, because I think it expresses much of what nursing is. It is a story of a 78 year
old woman who was admitted to a rehabilitation center
after suffering a stroke. She had right-sided weakness,
and wasn’t able to speak, but understood when she was spoken to. After many months, she greatly improved, both physically and in
her ability to speak, and now was preparing to be discharged. On her last day at the center, she told the nurses more about her life, where she grew up, when she got married, and raising her children,
and how she loved to bake for her grandchildren. She reminded the nurses
that underneath the disease and disabilities, she
was a person who laughed, who cried, who loved, and was loved. But she went on to tell the nurses about her experiences in the center. And when she would
describe in great detail how someone would bring her
fresh water in the morning, place it on her tray, and never
offered her a sip of water. She told them many times the staff would come into her room,
and never say hello. Never open the blinds to see the daylight, or the television to pass her day. She told them that
everyday, she received cards from her families and friends, but no one opened them to read to them. She said, I was treated
like an object and I wasn’t. I wanted to tell them
that I too was a mother, a grandmother, an aunt and a friend. I wanted them to understand
that I was someone who loved deeply and was loved in return. To you new nurses, and that
is what you are called now, remember that under the
diseases, the physical changes, the disabilities, and even
the ugliness of sickness, there is a person, a human
being who needs care. Who needs you to understand who they are, and to see beyond what is there, and to find the person beneath it all. In my end is my beginning. Your time here is ending. I challenge you to take
what you’ve learned here and be the best nurse you can be. Each of you is capable
of the call of nursing. Each of you is called to
nourish another human being. Follow your call, follow your dream. Follow your heart, and
you will never be lost. To each of you and every
one, I say congratulations. Be so ever proud of yourselves, and I wish you all the best in the world. (audience applauds) – Thank you Professor Nelan. Okay, ladies and gentlemen, this is the moment you’ve
all been waiting for. The Candlelighting Ceremony. I just want to instruct
you, remind those who know, that the lights in the
auditorium will dim. I also ask you to keep
your applause till the end. I know you’ve waited a
very, very long time. This is also your accomplishment. But we’d like to have
everybody hear their names. I believe you have lots of time to celebrate and cheer at the end. The candlelighters will
be Ms. Audrey Maroney, coordinator of our nursing
lab, and Ms. Barbara Caravanos, director of the Nursing Resource Center. Assisting me will be Jamila Abdul-Rahim. Jamila is the incoming
president of the SNA. Thank you Jamila. (uplifting piano music) Hamed Hossainian. Okwuchukwu Innocent Udemba. (uplifting piano music) Moses Kang. (uplifting piano music) Rajendra Lallchan. (uplifting piano music) Stephen Seubarran. (uplifting piano music) Martin Dookie. Ariel Joshua Korn. Ashley Tamara Gill. Evelyn Alejandra Lopez. Brandon Anthony Jones. Jeff Delmas. Renae Roberts-St. Hilaire. Yin Yun Zheng Li. Dylan Healy. Daniel Georges. Danny Rocky Dominguez. Yu Xie. Meagan Taylor Irizarry. Jovanie Guerrier. Monica Campanile. Earica Singh. Sara Baig. Zhouhua Chen. Su Hyun Hong. Yasmin Sheikh. Kelcey Hazell. (uplifting piano music) Oksana Zielinski. (uplifting piano music) Astrid Valencia Hernandez. (uplifting piano music) Merovee Kahouo. (uplifting piano music) Mariam Afiah Sawiba. (uplifting piano music) Shaunalee Williams. (uplifting piano music) Cassandra June Lombardi. (uplifting piano music) Jing Lu. (uplifting piano music) Leyya Pootoolal. (uplifting piano music) Izabela Florczyk. (uplifting piano music) Moona Zahid. (uplifting piano music) Katie Kim. (uplifting piano music) Hina Irfan. (uplifting piano music) Sehar Haider Rahman. (uplifting piano music) Maryann Otisi. (uplifting piano music) Jie Yang. (uplifting piano music) Sharon Eve Someck. (uplifting piano music) Rachel Yin. (uplifting piano music) Giselle Segarra. (uplifting piano music) Laura Estefenia Conforme Morales. (uplifting piano music) Laura Alicia Cepeda. (uplifting piano music) Stephanie Sharma. (uplifting piano music) Nicole Stephanie Norton. (uplifting piano music) Diego Vasquez. (uplifting piano music) Cassandra Lee. (uplifting piano music) Veronica Surujbhan. (uplifting piano music) Antonio Albert. (uplifting piano music) Audience, you were
great, let them hear it. (audience cheers) Okay. Good things come to those who wait. Ladies and gentlemen,
again, I present to you the graduating class of fall 2018. (audience cheers) The Nurses’ Pledge will be led by members of the outgoing Student
Nurses Association, Cassandra Lee, Veronica
Surujbhan, and Antonio Albert. (audience cheers)
(audience applauds) – [Audience Member] Go Cavs! – [Altogether] I will
strive with all my being and with the help of
God to become an open, honest, kind and diversified individual. In doing so, I will attain the qualities essential in the practice of nursing. For it is only after
realizing one’s self worth we are able to promote that of others. Deliverance of high quality healthcare is of essential importance. But let us also reach beyond
the treatment or diagnosis, and remember that entrusted
to my care is a human being, with all the loves, hates,
fears and idiosyncrasies that are an integral part
of the human species. Let me not grow too
comfortable in my knowledge, but actively seek out new information or continuance of my education. Being a nurse requires continuous growth. I dedicate myself to this cause, and my life to the profession of nursing. (audience applauds) – Graduates, you may
extinguish your candles. (audience applauds) Graduates, please be seated. At this time, Diego Vasquez,
the outgoing president of the Student Nurses Association, will deliver the farewell address. (audience cheers)
(audience applauds) – Good afternoon. On behalf of the graduating
class of fall 2018, and the Student Nursing Association, I would like to welcome
President Timothy Lynch, Dr. Palmer, Vice President
of Student Affairs, Dr. Kif, and our program
chairperson Anne Menendez. Faculty, family and friends, today we gather to celebrate
this great accomplishment. This candlelighting and pinning ceremony, which signifies the completion
of our nursing program, and the commencement
of our nursing careers. I would like to thank all of
our professors and faculty who, through their dedication for teaching and passion for nursing, have provided us with a perfect learning experience in both our clinical settings and lectures. We thank you for all the
support you have given us throughout our schooling
and the continuous support you have offered beyond
Queensborough Community College. You have demonstrated
what patient-centered care and advocacy means. You have instilled in us the importance for evidence-based practice
and continuing education. Most importantly, I’d like to acknowledge that we felt your love and empathy as we went from one exam
to the next, and throughout our journey at Queensborough
Community College. To the students, we each
have different stories and motives for why we chose
to enroll in this program. But we all have shared the same goal, which was to get through
this mini-bootcamp, as Professor Menendez calls it, to become the best we
can be, and continuously better ourselves in order to provide optimal care to our future patients. We all want to make a
difference in people’s lives. And there is no better career to do so than the nursing field. I’d like to state that after spending four semesters together,
over 20 hours a week, seeing each other four
to five days a week, spending much time helping each other, motivating and pushing each other, we have truly become a second family. I will forever remember this
journey we have taken together. Today we stand here not to say goodbye, but to embrace this moment of victory as we enter into the nursing community. You see, initially, this road seemed dreadful, perhaps even impossible. But through many sacrifices,
hard work, and perseverance, we may all agree that we can now ski tee. That is, to move onto what’s next to come. We came up with our own lingo during NU204 during the summer. My brothers and sisters,
I congratulate you on achieving this milestone. To the SNA officers, we all decided to go for a role in this association, anticipating crazy amounts
of additional work. And it was. But together, we made the
impossible achievable. It has been a privilege working with you and learning from you. You are all selfless
and caring individuals, who are truly meant to care for others. Together, we made our
small office a second home. One which many people came
to for help and guidance. And I’d like to thank you for all the work you have put in. Not just for the graduating
class of fall 2018, but for all the work and
dedication you put into helping others and those who preceded,
who are preceding us. To our families, friends and mentors, there aren’t any words
to express our gratitude. You too belong up here with us. You have provided us comfort, compassion, motivation and support. You have endured our
constant nursing talk, witnessed secondhand our
never-ending lectures and content, pretended to be our
patients while we practiced our assessment skills, put up with our never-ending nursing blah, blah, blah. I’m sure that’s how it
sounded like to many of you. I would also like to thank
those who are no longer with us. Or may not be able to
witness this achievement. For they too played a role in our success. We promise to provide
the care and attention we would expect of other
health professionals to uphold. To my daughters Eliana and Alessandra, and any other children whose parents and family stand on stage today, let this be a lesson that you too can do anything you set your minds to. Through hard work and dedication, there is no task you cannot complete, and no goal you won’t achieve. Thank you for being our
number one supporters. We love you. (audience applauds) – Thank you Diego. I would just like to take
a few moments to thank some people who have
helped this production. The SNA advisors, our
theater and stage personnel who are behind, the members of QPAC, and of course, our
photographers and videographers. This will be videotaped, so you’ll get to see it at the end. And also our student
volunteers, thank you very much. (audience applauds) The graduates have selected
the following faculty for the pinning section of this program. Professor Susan Riekert,
Professor Dolores Weber, Professor Janice Malloy,
and Professor Lina DiVanna. (audience applauds) We have something a little
special added to the program. Jung Lu of the graduating
class will now play a musical tribute to her class. Jung. – Jing.
– Jing, Jing. Jing.
(audience applauds) Graduates, please rise. (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) (inspiring piano music) (audience applauds) Wait, wait, one more, one more. You stay. Stay, stay, stay, stay. Ladies and gentlemen, we have one more. Jing, she’s been on the piano. (audience cheers) (uplifting piano music) (audience applauds) Thank you Jing. (audience applauds) Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve now come to the end of our program. Thank you for coming. Have a wonderful year. Happy new year. Have a good day. (audience applauds)

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